Project Profile: The Hospitality Center at Kootenai Health

By: Adrian Flint, Project Manager


Construction is typically only the beginning of a project’s journey – once the team hands over the keys, the client is provided with the space they need to advance their mission. The Hospitality Center in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, is a perfect example of Katerra’s commitment to not only build smarter but to help create better communities as well.

Kootenai Health, the main campus of the Hospitality Center, has experienced significant growth in the past few years. With more patients from outside the county seeking care at this facility, the need to address complex lodging needs for out-of-town patients became more urgent. Together with Community Cancer Fund and Ronald McDonald House Charities of the Inland Northwest, Kootenai Health ensures access to care by providing outstanding support services for patients and families. This time, it took the shape of the new Hospitality Center. 

Located on the northwest corner of Kootenai’s campus, the Center is comprised of two facilities: Walden House and the Ronald McDonald House, which have easy access to walking trails that connect to the rest of the campus. In all, the additions provide 12 adult rooms, six Ronald McDonald House rooms for pediatric patient families, and two swing rooms. The Center was designed to create a “home away from home,” with a shared kitchen, laundry facilities, and recreational spaces that allow visitors to live their lives as regularly as possible. Ronald McDonald House guests have access to additional services such as meal and pet therapy programs. The 18,000 square-foot center is also constructed with cross-laminated timber (CLT), a renewable building material whose biophilic properties are linked to improved physiological and psychological conditions in humans.

With this project, Katerra was given as an ideal fit to apply our model. Michael Green Architecture (MGA), a Katerra design partner, created the conceptual design. Katerra prepared the architectural documents and produced the wall and floor panels. Our trade teams constructed and installed the various Katerra direct-sourced materials, and the construction team brought it all together on site.

The on-time delivery did not come without extra effort from the entire team. At the finish of the project, the client shared this, “Please thank your team for their hard work. We appreciate them spending time with our staff, listening to our concerns, taking the time to answer our questions, and guiding us through this project. It’s very evident your team put their heart into the building of this Center.”

“We appreciate them spending time with our staff, listening to our concerns, taking the time to answer our questions, and guiding us through this project. It’s very evident your team put their heart into the building of this Center.”

Walking a completed project creates a range of emotions. The sense of accomplishment and pride in the people who dedicated so much energy and effort to see it through is palpable. And in this particular case, the project will be more appreciated than most due to its mission.

Learn more about Kootenai Health’s Hospitality Center:

Project Profile
Kootenai Health.org

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